Grants for black writers

As the Enlightenment gathered steam toward the end of Bach’s life, such views seemed to many of his colleagues to be outmoded or even a threat, as the product of the very same ancient, superstitious religion that the Enlightenment sought to escape. (There is an amazing book about Bach’s encounter with Enlightenment attitudes if you wish to learn more about this.)

For one, the wonderful basslines of Motown make it easy. And standout players in genres like funk, soul and neo-soul, R&B, and prog rock also make it fun to examine that low-end magic happening just beneath the surface. But throughout the 1960s and ’70s, where the songwriter reigned as king — seconded (if even) only by that of the heaven-descended lead guitarist — bassists were mostly criminally ignored.

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Nea our town grant recipients 2019

A prolific Nashville songwriter (who shall remain nameless) has a strategy where he wakes up and writes down five ideas, lines, or thoughts in his journal. In the sessions he goes to that day, he’ll pull from that list and use the words as the first line of the song, the last line of the song, the first line of the chorus — it could even just be a word. The point is, the words he writes down are often fresh to him, but they also came up for a reason — something he’s dealing with, or something a friend is going through — and he’s able to use that idea as a target for that day’s sessions.

You isolate the harmonics on a guitar string by lightly touching it in certain places to deaden some of the vibrations. If you touch the vibrating string at its halfway point, you can hear it vibrating in halves. (On the guitar, the halfway point is right at the twelfth fret.) If you touch the string a third of the way along its length, you can hear it vibrating in thirds. (On the guitar, this point is right at the seventh fret.) Each whole-numbered fraction of the string produces a different harmonic. The shorter string sections produce higher and quieter harmonics.

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National endowment for the arts dance grants

As a singer, keeping your voice hydrated is arguably the most important thing you can do to ensure proper vocal health. But vocal hydration doesn’t just mean drinking a lot of water — it’s about what you eat, the habits you keep, and knowing how your body processes what you’re putting into it throughout the day.

If you’ve got friends in a town you’re touring, don’t forget to tell them! Also, if you post to Facebook that you’ve got x amount of hours in x city, you may have old friends you had forgotten about come out of the woodwork. Maybe that person you knew from high school will want to take you out and show you their town.

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Gangsta rap lyrics cs

But Mitski (she’s much more impressive than Sum 41, not sorry) has a voice and quality in her music that feels super cathartic — it’s like she’s reading from your diary and releasing your demons for you. She’s also Asian-American, and I grew up with zero Asian-American musicians to look up to.

John Entwistle almost didn’t make this list, by virtue of being, well, too good. There are so many great Who songs to choose from, but one melody that tends to stick in my head is the pentatonic major run heard behind the “I tip my hat” refrain in this song. The riff starts at the relative minor and runs down to the root, hitting all five notes of the scale. It’s a simple sequence, but I’ve noticed that scalar walk-downs to the root pretty much always sound good on the bass. (For example, check out the choruses of the Beatles’ “Helter Skelter” and Kiss’ “Shout It Out Loud”). Entwistle repeats this motif several times throughout the chorus with slight variations that keep it continually compelling.

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